Quality of Care

Everyone's talking about the importance of quality in healthcare, but what does quality mean? When comparing hospitals, quality is measured in two different ways - using outcome data and process data.

Outcome quality data is based on mortality. In other words, it evaluates the number of patient deaths that occur at a hospital expressed as a percent of the total number of patients in the hospital. Outcome quality data is often risk-adjusted, taking into consideration the complexity of each patient's case and his or her likelihood to survive based on his or her specific condition and diagnosis.

Process quality data is based on the hospital's frequency of following the best practices or processes that have been shown through research to deliver the best results for most patients. For example, national research shows that giving patients an antibiotic within one hour before surgery reduces their risk of developing infections related to the surgery. Because patients tend to do better when this action or process is followed, this is an industry-wide quality measure.

While the two measures are very different, both are tracked by nationally recognized organizations and help hospitals identify areas in need of improvement.

= Better
= Same
= Worse

  • Outcome Quality Data 1
    July - September 2016

    Compared to Expected

    Baton Rouge General

    Expected

  • Overall Mortality Rate

    2.39%

    3.83%

  • Overall Unplanned Readmission Rate

    10.10%

    12.02%

  • Process Quality Data 2
    July - September 2016

    Compared to National Average

    Baton Rouge General

    National Average

  • Immunizations

  • Influenza Vaccination

    99%

    93%

  • Stroke Care

  • Received treatments to prevent blood clots

    100%

    98%

  • Received medicine to break up a blood clot within 3 hours after symptoms started

    100%

    89%

  • Received medication to reduce complications from blood clots

    98%

    98%

  • Received anticoagulation therapy for a certain type of irregular heartbeat

    100%

    97%

  • Received a prescription for a Statin upon discharge

    98%

    97%

  • Received a prescription for a blood thinner upon discharge

    100%

    99%

  • Received written educational materials about stroke care and prevention during the hospital stay

    100%

    95%

  • Evaluated for rehabilitation services

    100%

    99%

  • Venous Thromboembolism (VTE)

  • Venous Thromboembolism Warfarin Therapy Discharge Instructions

    100%

    93%

  • Perinatal Care

  • Elective Delivery

    14%

    2%

  • ED Throughput

  • Inpatient: Median time from ED arrival to ED departure for admitted ED patients

    398 minutes

    258 minutes

  • Outpatient: Median time from ED arrival to ED departure for discharged ED patients

    185 minutes

    138 minutes

= Better
= Same
= Worse

1 Outcome quality data is based on mortality. In other words, it evaluates the number of patients admitted to a hospital versus the number of patient deaths that occur at a hospital. Outcome quality data is often risk-adjusted, taking into consideration the complexity of each patient's case and their likelihood to survive based on their specific condition and diagnosis. This score is provided by Premier Clinical Adviser.

2 Process quality data is based on the hospital's frequency of following best practices or processes that have been shown through research to deliver the best results for most patients. So for example, national research shows that giving patients an antibiotic within one hour before surgery reduces their risk of developing infections related to the surgery. Because patients tend to do better when this process is followed, this is an industry-wide quality measure. Unless otherwise noted, the national average data reflects the average of all CMS scores as reported on CMS Hospital Compare.

*Refers to average scores as reported by the Joint Commission.